Meet The Neighbours

Close up detail of town house rooftops with chimneys against blue shy.

Due to some ‘life’ overload happening for me this week what I hoped to share with you is still in the oven.  That’s not something to be concerned about because it provides me with an opportunity to point out some excellent, inspiring, thought-provoking, and simply awesome posts I’ve read in the last week or so by fellow Christ-following bloggers whose writing I enjoy.

So let me introduce you to some friendly neighbours in cyberspace who I hope will bless, stretch and refresh you as much as they have me.  Let me know what you think of them in the ‘comments’ section (and comment in their own if they have one).  I may even make this a regular feature on Bread for the Bride.

Here we go  (just click on the link to read the recommended article):

Over at One Train Wreck After Another Tim Fall has a great post about the latest absurdity from some complementarian leaders eager to score points in the ongoing gender debate:  sanctified testosterone.  Yep, you read it right:  ‘sanctified testosterone’ no less.  That’s apparently the most recent catch phrase coined in support of exclusive male leadership in the church.  What can I say?  Read and weep…..or chuckle uproariously, as the case may be.

My friend Tiffany Clark shares some beautiful thoughts on what it means to be part of the royal priesthood in her post Priesting Lessons, When God Invites Us To Dinner .  Check her out at her blog Messy Theology.  Here’s a taste:

‘… just as communion is by nature a communal act, our priestly calling is anything but something to be limited to our private lives. We are those whom God has called into relationship with Himself so that we might represent Him to others and others to Him. His blessing on those around us is mediated by our faithfulness to intercede on their behalf before His throne and to speak on His behalf into their lives.’

Mr. Teague has a great post about The New Pharisees on his blog The Voice of One.  Quote:

‘Non-Christians often think phariseeism or fundamentalism is a religious problem. The thinking is that if we get rid of religion we get rid of phariseeism. But phariseeism is a human problem, not a religious problem. As society has grown more secular, we’ve seen the rise of new Pharisees.’

And finally, have your soul refreshed and invigorated by the stunning photography and healing words of Charis in her Ishshah’s Story post Behold, where she writes:

‘How is it that a young child can recognize beauty? Why are we attracted to beautiful things – music, art, poetry, dance, light, colour, design, order, balance, play? Who placed the appreciation of creation in our hearts? … Who planted the craving for beauty within us?’

(You can enjoy more of Charis’ posts at Charis, Subject to Change.)

Sometimes it’s good to get together with the neighbours, don’t you think?  I hope you find encouragement and enjoyment in this selection of writings from gifted disciples of Christ.



Categories: Meet The Neighbours

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7 replies

  1. I don’t read a lot of blogs, but Charis’ and yours are two of my favorites.

    Like

  2. Thanks for including me in the line-up, Cheryl. What a great encouragement to wake up to!

    I really enjoyed clicking over to see Charis’s photo essay too. Stunning pics.

    Like

  3. Thank you, Cheryl. I can’t wait to read whatever you have in that oven.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Once again, Cheryl, you lead by example. Thank for pulling this community together in closer touch with each other. Is there a feminine version for the name “Barnabas”?

    Liked by 2 people

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